Gratitude Interview #3 – Tammy Tibbetts of She’s The First

Tammy Tibbetts is the Founder and President of She’s The First; a global movement that is raising funds and awareness that helps women and girls in developing countries to finish their secondary education. Her work has helped hundreds of girls around the world become the first women in their families to graduate from secondary school.

Tammy is a passionate and tireless advocate of education for women and girls. She’s a rockstar social entrepreneur that’s been recognized by Fast Company’s League of Extraordinary Women, Most Creative People in Business 1000, and featured in Forbes and Times 30 Under 30 in Education.

In this interview, we discuss:

0:50 – How do you answer the question “What do you do?”

1:10 – Why did you start “She’s The First?”

4:50 – What do you wish you knew when you were first starting out?

5:45 – If you were to acknowledge one mentor or figure who has been responsible for your growth and development as an entrepreneur, who would that person be?

9:00 – Who is a friend that’s shaped who you are today?

11:05 – What are some of the most important and lasting lessons you’ve taken away from members of your family?

“Don’t validate your self-worth by the school you went to or where you work.”

13:15 – How do you define your sense of value and self-worth as an entrepreneur?

“Define your sense of value and self-worth by living up to your own standards”

14:25 – What’s your theme for 2016?

17:25 – What is a piece of art or book that’s had a significant impact on your life?

19:40 – What’s one award/achievement you’re really proud of?

“Being shy isn’t an excuse; your voice matters. Speak up about what you care about.”

21:00 – Who helped you find your own voice when you were growing up?

22:30 – Where can people find out about you and your work?

Gratitude Interview #2 – Hannah Brencher of More Love Letters

Hannah is the founder of The World Needs More Love Letters (MLL), a letter exchange dedicated to connecting strangers across the globe through the art of letter writing. Through MLL, she’s grown her global community  across 6 continents, 59 countries, all 50 states and over 70 college campuses.

As a rising social entrepreneur she’s been named as one of the White House’s “Women Working to Do Good”, TED speaker with over a million views, and a published author whose memoir “If You Find This Letter” will be in bookstores worldwide this March.

Hannah is one of those people that exudes an internal light that you just want to be around. She is honest about her own struggle and it makes her story all the more powerful. We hope you enjoy the chat as much as we did.

In this interview, we discuss:

  • 0:45 – How do you answer the question “what do you do?”
  • 1:47 – Why is this the work that you’ve chosen?
  • 5:24 – What do you now know about running a business that you wish you knew when you were starting out?
  • 7:32 – If you were to acknowledge one mentor or figure who has been largely responsible for your growth and development as an entrepreneur, who would that person be and why?

Tammy Tibbetts of She’s the First

  • 12:15 – If you were to point out one of your family members who has inspired you and contributed to who are as a human being, who would it be and why?
  • 15:50 – Who is a friend that has been one of the largest contributing factors to you being who you are and why?

Eryn Eddy of So Worth Loving

  • 21:34 – How do you show people that they matter?
  • 24:04 – Who is an artist or a creator who has impacted your life and why?
  • 28:07 – What is something you’re really thankful for at the moment, and one thing you’re looking forward to?
  • 30:07 – If you were to say #ILoveYouBecause to your boyfriend, how would you finish that statement?
  • 31:10 – Where can people find you and your work online?

Gratitude Interview #1 – Levi Felix, Founder of Camp Grounded and Digital Detox

Levi Felix is the Founder & CEO of Digital Detox and Camp Grounded – A Summer Camp for Adults. Camp Grounded is an internationally renowned, tech-free wellness retreat that everyone should experience. Levi has been helping people disconnect from their devices, unplug from our noisy worlds and reconnect with the good stuff; our community, nature and ourselves for years.

He is one of the more thoughtful entrepreneurs we’ve met and has some poignant thoughts about building more mindful, meaningful, and balanced lives, online & off.

In this interview, we discuss the inspiration behind his work, why pressing pause is necessary to re-connect, and talk about the people who have significantly impacted his life:

  • 0:32 – How do you answer the question “what do you do?”
  • 2:03 – What advice would you give to people so they can evaluate their relationship with technology and their devices?
  • 3:42 – Who is a friend that has been one of the largest contributing factors to you being who you are?
  • 6:07 – If you were to acknowledge one mentor or figure who has been responsible for your growth and development as an entrepreneur, who would that person be?
  • 10:05 – Why are you grateful for your partner?
  • 14:10 – If you were to point out one of your family members who has inspired you and contributed to who are as a human being, who would it be?
  • 16:42 – Where can people find out about you and your work?

 

Finding Inspiration Interview with Sherry Turkle

Have you ever texted to avoid an uncomfortable phone call?

Have you ever pulled out your phone to browse social media while you were out with friends? 

Have you ever found yourself reaching for your phone subconsciously, for no apparent reason?

If so, then you might enjoy our interview with the pioneering cultural analyst, Sherry Turkle (@sturkle). Professor Turkle is one of the leading voices on how technology is shaping our relationship with others and ourselves. She has a new book coming out this week called “Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age.” I got to chat with her about the new book, her vision for the future, and what inspired her to study the intersection of technology and human connection.

I first learned about Sherry from her now famous TED talk called “Connected, But Alone.” In her talk, she beautifully discusses the idea we are asking for more from technology and less from each other. She was one of the first people to articulate the false sense of connectivity that our devices and online personas have brought to prominence.

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Jonathan Franzen recently reviewed her book for the New York Times and his opening paragraph summarize her contribution and place in society better than I can…

Sherry Turkle is a singular voice in the discourse about technology. She’s a skeptic who was once a believer, a clinical psychologist among the industry shills and the literary hand-wringers, an empiricist among the cherry-picking anecdotalists, a moderate among the extremists, a realist among the fantasists, a humanist but not a Luddite: a grown-up. She holds an endowed chair at M.I.T. and is on close collegial terms with the roboticists and affective-computing engineers who work there. Unlike Jaron Lanier, who bears the stodgy weight of being a Microsoft guy, or Evgeny Morozov, whose perspective is Belarussian, Turkle is a trusted and respected insider. As such, she serves as a kind of conscience for the tech world.

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Sherry challenges us to ask important questions about the role that we want technology to play in our lives. If we aren’t intentional with the way we use our devices and conscious about how we conduct ourselves online, we risk developing habits that eliminate the authenticity and thoughtfulness that is essential for the human connection we need to live a happy life.

Let’s all take a moment to question WHY we are using our devices the way we are and ask if we’re happy with the role they have in our lives.

Use your devices and technology because you truly want to, not because you did it a certain way yesterday.